Wild Relatives: Conversation and Film Screening

We here at the Streetsville BIA are very excited to announce that we have partnered with The Blackwood Gallery at UTM to bring something a little different to our local Village Square.

The Blackwood Gallery is a contemporary art centre situated on the University of Toronto Mississauga campus, and dedicated to open, public research. They present curated exhibitions featuring the work of local, national, and international professional artists in three spaces: the Blackwood Gallery in room 140 of the Kaneff Centre on Inner Circle Road, the e|gallery on the ground floor of the Communication, Culture, and Information Technology Building (CCT), and the Bernie Miller Lightbox on the outside of William Davis Building.

On Sunday, August 25th we will be holding a film screening and conversation of the film Wild Relatives, by Jumana Manna. There will be a conversation held beforehand with respondents from this field, where guests can ask questions and have their curiosity piqued for the upcoming film. More specific details can be found below.

Wild Relatives: Screening and Conversation
By: Jumana Manna, Wild Relatives, 2018
Documentary: 66 minutes.
Conversation: At 7:00 pm
Screening: At 8:00 pm

Synopsis

In 2012, an international agricultural research centre was forced to relocate from Aleppo, Syria, to the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon due to the Syrian Revolution turned war. Having left behind its seed bank, the research centre began a laborious process of planting their seed collection from back-ups stored in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. Introduced by a conversation with Environmental Studies and Cinema Studies researchers, the film traces entangled global conditions of environmental destruction, and explores tensions between state and individual, industrial and organic approaches to seed saving, climate change and biodiversity, witnessed through the journey of these seeds.

Artist

Jumana Manna is an artist working primarily with film and sculpture. Her work explores how power is articulated through relationships, often focusing on body and materiality in relation to narratives of state building and histories of place.

Respondents
Justin Podur is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University. In addition to his scientific publications, he is the author of Haiti’s New Dictatorship and the upcoming novel, Siegebreakers.

Sara Saljoughi is Assistant Professor of English and Cinema Studies at the University of Toronto. Her areas of research include international cinemas, film theory, postcolonial theory, and migration and diaspora studies. She is co-editor of the book 1968 and Global Cinema. Currently she is writing a book on the aesthetics and politics of cinema in Iran during the 1960s and 1970s.

 

There is no cost associated with this event, just bring your curiosity and come out to enjoy this eye-opening film! For more information please visit  our Faceboook event page at: https://www.facebook.com/events/2315515405152786/

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